Chanting A Love Supreme

Gayatri Mantra:  

Om, Bhur bhuvah svah

tat savitur vareniyam

bhargo devasya dhimahi

dhiyo yo nah prachodayat 

Translation:

Everything on the Earth and in the sky and in between is arising from one effulgent source. If my thoughts, words, and deeds reflected a complete understanding of this, I would be the peace I am seeking in this moment.

 Photo by Joshua Terry woundedmosquito.com

Photo by Joshua Terry woundedmosquito.com

There is a mantra that I've been working to understand for several years. It's The Gayatri Mantra, one of the oldest mantras in existence. It's more than 12 thousand years old and comes from the Rigveda, an ancient Sanskrit text containing hymns and mantras that are mythological and poetic accounts of the origin of the world. I struggle to understand it because it suggests that when I'm feeling freaked out by something, I already have peace or am the peace that I feel I lack. Likewise, this mantra suggests that somehow through one Source, we are everything else. And to any mind that is caught up in limited a conception of Self, this is ridiculous.

One experience I had that helped me to understand this mantra a little better happened about three or four years ago while I was on an early-morning run in Hawaii. Because my body was used to a different time zone, I was up and running while most of everybody else was sleeping. On that beautiful morning, I ran along a paved trail that contours the ocean and stretches for miles. All the elements including myself were harmonized to make a perfect storm of physical, mental, and spiritual bliss. My mind was clear, the weather, temperature, altitude and humidity were all perfect. As I ran, my mind opened up to incredible clarity.

In this clarity, I began processing some of the jazz improve theory that my sax teacher had been teaching me, specifically regarding works by John Coltrane. My feet tapped along the trail and my lungs bellowed the humid ocean-air while my mind thought about scales, intervals, harmonics, chords, and all of the underlying structure of jazz. My sax teacher tells me that if I want to find those notes coming out of my horn, I have to not only feel them in my soul, but I also gotta know what is possible to feel and that takes a little head work. With all this mental clarity some fairly complex music theory simply started to make sense to me. Deeper musical ideas began to percolate to my mental surface causing new lights to go on. I was figuring it out and it was happening without any teacher or even the reference of my sax or even music paper. I realized that somehow, a lot of this understanding was already in there.

Amazed at these musical revelations, an immense thought dawned upon me: even if it's waaaay down there, there is a John Coltrane in me somewhere. The perfect run connected me to Source, even just a little bit, and that led me to somehow understand Coltrane a little better. If I truly understood the connection of all things, if I were truly tapped into Source like the Gayatri Mantra suggests, I'd be able to access that same power, soul, and knowledge that John Coltrane did. Me! John Coltrane!

Chanting A Love Supreme

Coltrane was connected to Source. He demonstrates this plainly in his most spiritual work, some say the most spiritual of all of jazz, his album called A Love Supreme. In it he makes circles both in the arc of the sound in music as well as in its form; this chord and this phrase makes a logical, mathematical, and aurally pleasing transition to the next, and the next until the formula causes it to arrive back to where it started. Just as you might hear Brahman priests chanting the Gayatri Mantra from the Rigveda, in this recording you hear these priests of jazz chant, "A Love Supreme" repeatedly in the background evoking Source. You see, in certain disciplines initiates get a new name. In yoga your name might become Yogananda, or Ram Das, for jazz it might be Trane or Bird. I believe that in the métier of transcendent jazz (read: heaven), God was given the nickname, A Love Supreme. Fitting. I think God uses it as a Facebook handle, or something. In part, Coltrane's message was that everything is inscribed within A Love Supreme. A Love Supreme is The Effulgent Source mentioned in the Gayatri Mantra and to fully comprehend this Source means to understand everything, including peace, including jazz, including yourself. This is enlightenment and whether your path there incorporated practicing either poses or jazz theory or anything else, you still end up at the same place.

Alice Coltrane, J.C.'s wife at the time, said that one day Trane locked himself in the attic and didn't come down for three days. He spent the entire time meditating (understand that Coltrane meditated with his horn in his mouth) and when he came down, I imagine that it was like Moses coming down from the mountain after talking to God, he looked at his wife and said, "I've got it!" A few days later he was in the studio with a few hand-picked musicians to record A Love Supreme, one of the greatest pieces of music ever conceived. We are still chanting the Gayatri Mantra 12 thousand years later. I hope people are chanting A Love Supreme, or at lease spinning the record, 12 thousand years from now.

Understanding, even theoretically, that knowing Source means to know everything, doesn't discount the hours, weeks, years, and lifetimes of work and practice necessary to get there, but still the idea is provocative that our work isn't to build or gain anything new, rather to dismantle that which prevents us from seeing what's already there. What we practice in yoga is paying attention and we use breath, poses, and mediation to open our eyes and to take off the bandages to reveal what's underneath.

Another reference to understanding this universal Source comes from the story about the day Zen came to be. It is said that long ago an assembly gathered to hear the Buddha's Dharma talk. Instead of a discourse, The Buddha simply held up a flower saying nothing. He stayed like that for a long time much to the confusion of most everyone. Only the sage Mahakashyapa understood, and noted it with a wry smile. With his flower, the Buddha was saying that which could not be spoken by words. He was showing the assembly that Being or Reality had no boundaries and was found in everything, including a flower, and to even try to define Being or Reality by words would create a boundary for something that had none. Anything defined would have been a contradiction yet at the same time he was revealing that which was everywhere, if your understanding would allow you to see. "If my thoughts words and deeds reflected a complete understanding of this unity," . . . I would realize that I'm no different than this flower, or my music, or you, and I would understand that peace is already within me. And yet to understand this, like myriad myths throughout history also suggest, it might take me traveling the entire world to realize that what I was searching for was at home all along, locked within the vault of my heart.

Join me this week as we practice understanding the Gayatri Mantra better and practice unraveling anything that would prevent us from seeing our own Effulgent Source, our True Nature, our Love Supreme. And since it is said that Visvamitra was the one who gave us the Gayatri Mantra, we'll work on exploring Reality through Visvamitrasana. Speaking of "getting Real," once I start working on my inflexible hamstrings, something necessary for that pose, things get real, really fast.

I suggest making the time to listen to A Love Supreme this week. It's an incredible and historic piece of music.

Also, speaking of the saxophone, if you're in interested in coming to see me and my band, The Soulistics, perform, we have an exciting summer line up. Click here to check out our next performance!

Here are a few poems that also speak to connection and revelation to Self and Source.


Excerpt from Prelude

Two miles I had to walk along the fields

Before I reach'd my home. Magnificent          330

The Morning was, a memorable pomp,

More glorious than I ever had beheld;

The Sea was laughing at a distance; all

The solid Mountains were as bright as clouds,

Grain-tinctured, drench'd in empyrean light;    335

And, in the meadows and the lower grounds,

Was all the sweetness of a common dawn,

Dews, vapours, and the melody of birds,

And Labourers going forth into the fields.

--Ah! need I say, dear Friend, that to the brim             340

My heart was full; I made no vows, but vows

Were then made for me; bond unknown to me

Was given, that I should be, else sinning greatly,

A dedicated Spirit. On I walk'd

In blessedness which even yet remains.                    345

~ William Wordsworth


Initiation, II

 At the crossroads, hens scratched circles
into the white dust. There was a shop
where I bought coffee and eggs, coarse-grained
chocolate almost too sweet to eat.
When I walked up the road, the string sack
heavy on my arm, I thought
that my legs could take me anywhere,
into any country, any life.
The air, dazzling as sand, grew dense
with light: bougainvillea spilled
over the salmon walls, the road
veered into the ravine. The world
could be those colors, the mangoes,
the melons, the avocado evenings
releasing their circles of moon.
I climbed the pink stairs, entered
the house as calm and ephemeral
as my own certainty:
this is my house, my key,
my hand with its new lines.
I am as old as I will ever be.

~Nina Bogin